Monday, March 18, 2013

Rolex Prince

The 1930s Rolex Prince has always been my favourite together with the bubbleback. The price of the prince during the 1930s were considered ultra high then.
As mentioned, these watches are currently "under value" as many collectors are only chasing after the sports models that are very high in prices. In economic, we have learn to do the opposite to buy low and sell high. Given the relatively low prices for these "not so popular" products, over the years, I have managed to find many of these watches relatively cheap and I believe the prices for these watches will escalate in the near future. From the recent trend, one can see the return to smaller size watches as these are more comfortable to wear. Dress watch will always hold its place in the heart of the real watch connoisseur.
From the net:
The Rolex Prince is a  beautiful watch, but one that was neither water-resistant nor self-winding. Even though it was rectangular, a shape that infrequently has survived and one that has not been used by Rolex for many years.. The Prince has a high-quality movement. It was an elegant watch. Clearly a product of the 1920s, the fine design of the Prince in the 1930s allowed a Depression-era clientele to retain a symbol of luxury. Rolex advertising promoted the Prince as "the watch for men of distinction" .
If the Rolex Prince primarily represented an object of fashion, it did so with aplomb. Introduced in 1928 –shortly after the Oyster advertising campaign following Miss Gleitz's swim, the Prince sported a movement developed a few years before. This movement, by Hermann Aegler, was a shaped (rectangular) one, which had its winding barrel at one end and a large balance at the other end. This theoretically allowed a larger barrel, which in turn allowed a longer mainspring – and therefore longer autonomy (reportedly 58 hours). At the same time, this layout theoretically allowed a larger balance in a small watch, increasing accuracy. The movement, which is depicted at right and is from a similar watch by Gruen, shows the balance at the top and the barrel at the bottom. When used in the Rolex, the movement was regulated in six positions and often was sold as a Chronometer
 




There are many reasons for my purchase. Firstly, it's a stainless steel ( the are many gold replica cases in the market, so be aware). Secondly, it comes with the original dial which is getting harder to find nowadays. Thirdly, it will fit nicely with the rest of the Rolex Prince..



























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